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the approbation of this department for his fidelity and valor."  [CMSR No. 454, Brigham's, No. 454, State Library.]
Dr. W. N. Rowell of Denton, who knew him in his old age, has written an interesting account of Hitchcock, the man. He came from a Georgia home of wealth and refinement. Five of the Victoria prisoners planned to escape together, but their first plan to do so was discovered by the Mexicans. One of the prisoners was suspected of having betrayed it to the enemy; so Hitchcock and Gamble on their next attempt did not take the others into their confidence. They were travelling with a detachment engaged in hauling boats, and at the crossing of a small stream, at dusk, they slid off the wagon into the water, dived, swam some distance under water, and so escaped. Their guards, with whom they had made friends, seem to have looked conveniently the other way.

Hitchcock prospered, and lived for many years at Shreveport, La., where he owned many acres of fertile Red River lands. Just prior to the Civil War he lost his entire family in an epidemic of yellow fever. After the war he spent two years in Brazil, planning to establish a southern colony there, but finally concluded that it was not practicable. He lived at Denton for several years before his death. Those who remember him there insist, on the basis of their recollections of his own stories of his adventures in the spring of 1836, that he was one of those who escaped directly from the massacre of March 27th. They urge their belief on this point, though it is in conflict with all of the documentary evidence, on the strength of the old soldier's well known reputation for honesty and truth. In


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© 1936 Harbert Davenport
NOTES FROM AN UNFINISHED STUDY OF FANNIN AND HIS MEN
H. David Maxey, Editor             Webpage of January 1, 2000