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April 2017

April 2017 cover
Vol No.: 
CXXI

Cover: “Texas: Church of Alamo, San Antonio de Bexar.” From the Illustrated London News, 1844. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. This issue of the Southwestern Historical Quarterly arrives at the time of year when residents of the Lone Star State mark several significant anniversaries related to the Texas Revolution, such as the Battle of the Alamo. Appropriately, one of the articles we are publishing this month focuses on the Revolution: “‘This Is A Cruel Truth, But I Cannot Omit It’: The Origin and Effect of Mexico’s No Quarter Policy in the Texas Revolution” by Richard Bruce Winders.

Table of Contents: 

Articles

“This Is A Cruel Truth, But I Cannot Omit It”: The Origin and Effect of Mexico’s No Quarter Policy in the Texas Revolution
By Richard Bruce Winders

Two Episodes in Texas Indian History Reconsidered: Getting the Facts Right about the Lafuente Attack and the Fort Parker Raid
By Daniel J. Gelo

Seeing Like a Stomach: Food, the Body, and Jeffersonian Exploration in the Near Southwest, 1804–1808
By Michael D. Wise

Southwestern Collection
 

Book Reviews

David Martin Davis Jr., Texas Land Grants, 1750–1900: A Documentary History.
By Brian A. Stauffer

Manuel González Oropeza and Jesús F. de la Teja, eds., Actas del Congreso Constituyente de Coahuila y Texas de 1824 a 1827. Primera Constitución bilingüe/Proceedings of the Constituent Congress of Coahuila and Texas, 1824–1827: Mexico’s Only Bilingual Constitution.
By Sam W. Haynes

Detlef Dent, Journey to Texas, 1833.
By Marian J. Barber

Bruce A. Glasrud and Milton S. Jordan, eds. Free Blacks in Antebellum Texas.
By Jermaine Thibodeaux

Glen Sample Ely, The Texas Frontier and the Butterfield Overland Mail, 1858–1861.
By Debbie Liles

Timothy S. Huebner, Liberty and Union: The Civil War Era and American Constitutionalism.
By Ronald E. Goodwin

Robert W. Glover and J. Barto Arnold III, The Blockade Runner Denbigh and the Union Navy: Including Glover’s Analysis of the West Gulf Blockade and Archival Materials and Notes.
By R. Blake Dunnavent

John F. Schmutz, “The Bloody Fifth”: The 5th Texas Regiment, Hood’s Texas Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
By Charles Marks

James T. Matthews, Frontier Horsemen of the Confederacy: Major’s Texas Cavalry Brigade.
By Brian Elliott

Lori Davisson with Edgar Perry and the staff of the White Mountain Apache Cultural Center, Dispatches from the Fort Apache Scout: White Mountain and Cibecue Apache History through 1881.
By Nancy J. Parezo

Paul Andrew Hutton, The Apache Wars: The Hunt for Geronimo, the Apache Kid, and the Captive Boy Who Started the Longest War in American History.
By Thomas A. Britten

Erica Cottam, Hubbell Trading Post: Trade, Tourism, and the Navajo Southwest.
By Lauren Brand

Andrew Needham, Power Lines: Phoenix and the Making of the Modern Southwest.
By Robert E. Krause

John R. Gram, Education at the Edge of Empire: Negotiating Pueblo Identity in New Mexico's Indian Boarding Schools.
By Rick Hendricks

Melissa Bingmann, Prep School Cowboys: Ranch Schools in the American West.
By Jason E. Pierce

Susan E. Gray and Gayle Gullet, eds., Contingent Maps: Rethinking Western Women’s History and the North American West.
By Renee Laegreid

Kevin Z. Sweeney, Prelude to the Dust Bowl: Drought in the Nineteenth-Century Southern Plains.
By Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

Jack De Mattos and Chuck Parsons, The Notorious Luke Short: Sporting Man of the Wild West.
By Bill O’Neal

Michael Grauer, Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man.
By Bonnie A. Campbell

James R. Woodall, 12 Aggie War Heroes: From World War I to Vietnam.
By Christopher Bean

Mitchel P. Roth, Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo.
By Paul M. Lucko

Gastón Espinosa, Latino Pentecostals in America: Faith and Politics in Action.
By David Cameron