San Jacinto Symposium: Speakers

hero imageSpeakers

James E. Crisp

Professor of History at North Carolina State University. His book, Sleuthing the Alamo: Davy Crockett’s Last Stand and Other Mysteries of the Texas Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2004) won the T. R. Fehrenbach Award from the Texas Historical Commission. Texas A&M University Press published his How Did Davy Die? And Why Do We Care So Much? In 2010, the year he was inducted as a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association. A Rice University graduate, Dr. Crisp earned his Ph.D. in history from Yale University. He has helped select Symposium speakers and served as moderator for the past dozen years.

Richard Bruce Winders

Curator and Historian at the Alamo since July 1996. His works include Crisis in the Southwest: The United States, Mexico and the Struggle over Texas (Brown Littlefield, 2002), Sacrificed at the Alamo: Tragedy and Triumph in the Texas Revolutions (State House Press, 2003); and a book for juveniles, Davy Crockett: Legend of the Wild Frontier (Rosen, 2003). His latest book length publication is entitled Panting for Glory: The Mississippi Volunteers in the Mexican War, released by Texas A&M Press in 2016. His has served as consultant for the History Channel, Discovery Channel, Travel Channel, as well as appeared on their programs.

Caroline Castillo Crimm

Owner, Historic Tours of Texas. She was born in Mexico City and moved to the United States with her family while in her teens. She attended the University of Miami for her BA, taught at Winter Park High School and worked in Personnel in Naples, Florida. She moved to Texas in 1980 and discovered her Mexican family had lived in Texas from 1792 until the 1880s when they lost their Spanish land grant to a neighboring Anglo family and moved to Reynosa, Tamaulipas. She finished her MA at Texas Tech and her PhD at the University of Texas at Austin. She taught at Sam Houston State University from 1992 until retired. She is starting her own company Historic Tours of Texas and lives with her husband Jack just north of Huntsville, Texas.

Paula Marks

Professor Emerita of American Studies, St. Edward's University. Among her works are Turn Your Eyes Toward Texas: Pioneers Sam and Mary Maverick (Texas A&M, 1989), Hands to the Spindle: Texas Women and Home Textile Production, 1822-1880 (Texas A&M, 1996), and "Carving Out Creative Enterprise as a Woman in Texas, 1836-1900" in Creators and Consumers: Women and Material Culture and Visual Art in 19th-Century Texas, the Lower South, and the Southwest (Vol. 5, David B. Warren Symposium, 2016).

Jeff Dunn

Practicing attorney with Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr, PC in Dallas. He has had a lifelong interest in the battle of San Jacinto. Jeff has lectured and published articles on the battle, presented tours of the battleground, and advocated for the preservation and interpretation of the battleground landscape. He co-founded the nonprofit San Jacinto Battleground Association (also called the San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy) in 2002 and served as Chairman of the San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board (2000-2007) as an appointee of Governors George W. Bush and Rick Perry. He has also served as Chairman of the Dallas County Historical Commission and as a Board member of the Texas State Historical Association.

Mary L. Scheer

Professor of History at Lamar University and Director of the Center for History and Culture. She is a former Fulbright Scholar to Germany and has authored/edited five books including Women in Texas History, which won the Liz Carpenter Award for Texas Women's History. Her research interests include Texas, women, early twentieth century U.S. and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.

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