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TEXAS ROSE FESTIVAL. The Texas Rose Festival is held each year at Tyler, Smith County, sometimes called the Rose Capital of America. The first festival, organized by the women of the Tyler Garden Club, the Chamber of Commerce, and local rose growers, was held in October 1933. Volunteers raised $1,500 to cover expenses, and several thousand people from fifteen states attended. Margaret Copland of Tyler was crowned first Rose Queen. The celebration, originally known as the East Texas Rose Festival, was renamed during the Texas Centennial in 1936. The festival was suspended during World War II but has been held annually since. Events include a Rose Show, the Coronation of the Rose Queen, and a colorful parade of floats and bands. In 1989 an estimated 100,000 people attended the celebration, which featured thirteen floats and a budget of $250,000. See also ROSE INDUSTRY.


Henry M. Bell, "The Texas Rose Festival Celebrates Fifty-Six Years of Tradition," Tyler Today, Fall 1989. Frank Bronaugh, Fifty Years: Texas Rose Festival Association, 1933–1983 (Tyler: Texas Rose Festival Association, 1984?).

Christopher Long

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Christopher Long, "TEXAS ROSE FESTIVAL," Handbook of Texas Online (, accessed December 01, 2015. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.