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WEST TEXAS MUSIC HALL OF FAME

WEST TEXAS MUSIC HALL OF FAME. The West Texas Music Hall of Fame is a nonprofit organization that was established in 1995 to “honor, preserve and advocate the creative talent from West Texas…through preservation, development and education.” In this capacity the Hall of Fame includes an honor roll of musicians, songwriters, and music pioneers and chronicles the biographical information of these artists. Such luminaries as Buddy Holly, Sonny Curtis, Waylon Jennings, Buddy Knox, Mac Davis, Guy Clark, Dan Seals, Jerry Allison, Carolyn Hester, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, and many more are recognized.

The organization maintains an educational website that also has spotlight features on various West Texas artists, radio, and music events as well as a West Texas Songs Hall of Fame that tells the story behind such classics as “Amarillo By Morning,” “Abilene,” and “El Paso.” The West Texas Music Hall of Fame also presents special achievement awards to individuals who carry out the mission of promoting and preserving the musical heritage of West Texas.

The West Texas Music Hall of Fame safeguards a large collection of Texas music memorabilia and in 2011 was seeking a permanent location to house a museum. Many of the items have been gathered by Sid Holmes, director of the West Texas Music Hall of Fame. Holmes penned “Last Kiss,” a song made famous by J. Frank Wilson and the Cavaliers in 1964. The “singularly unique collection” helps to preserve the rich legacy of West Texas music.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Abilene Reporter-News, July 22, 2009. West Texas Music Hall of Fame (http://www.westexmusichof.com/), accessed December 14, 2011.

Laurie E. Jasinski

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Laurie E. Jasinski, "WEST TEXAS MUSIC HALL OF FAME," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/klw02), accessed April 19, 2015. Uploaded on March 17, 2015. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.