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TEXAS CONJUNTO MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM

TEXAS CONJUNTO MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM. The Texas Conjunto Music Hall of Fame and Museum is located in San Benito, housed in the San Benito Community Building that also holds the San Benito History Museum and the Freddy Fender Museum. The Hall of Fame and Museum honors musicians, recording executives, and other individuals who have contributed their talent and vision to conjunto, one of the cornerstones of Texas music. La Villita Dance Hall is another cultural institution that the Hall of Fame and Museum recognizes and preserves.

The Texas Conjunto Music Hall of Fame and Museum also maintains archives and permanent exhibits of regional conjunto music legends. Some of the most notable Tejanos who contributed to the San Benito conjunto music legacy are Paco Betancourt, who operated the Rio Grande Music Company there and helped distribute the Ideal label records; Narcisco Martínez, the father of Texas-Mexican conjunto music; and Freddy Fender, a native of San Benito who achieved fame in Tejano, rock-and-roll, and country music. The institution also annually inducts members into its hall of fame and began naming honorees in 2001. Through 2010, forty-eight conjunto pioneers had been inducted into the Texas Conjunto Music Hall of Fame. In 2011 Reynaldo Avila, Sr., served as president.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Elaine Ayala, “South Texas museum tour,” Latino Life Blogs (http://blog.mysanantonio.com/latinlife/2007/11/south-texas-museum-tour/), accessed November 27, 2011. Texas Conjunto Music Hall of Fame & Museum (http://www.texasconjuntomusic.org/aboutus.html), accessed November 27, 2011.

Teresa Palomo Acosta

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Teresa Palomo Acosta, "TEXAS CONJUNTO MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kltst), accessed August 01, 2015. Uploaded on April 26, 2015. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.