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SCOTT, JAMES [1799–1856]

SCOTT, JAMES (1799–1856). James Scott, early plantation owner, was born in Milledgeville, Georgia, on March 15, 1799. In Tennessee, where he was a friend of David Crockett, he married Sarah Lane. The couple moved to Mississippi, where Scott studied law and became a judge of the Mississippi Supreme Court. In 1838 or 1839 they moved to Montgomery County, Texas, and established a plantation. Scott represented his district at the Convention of 1845 and protested the homestead exemption provisions in the Constitution of 1845. In August 1856 the steamship Nautilus, on which he was a passenger, was sunk in the Gulf of Mexico during a storm, and he was drowned.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Founders and Patriots of the Republic of Texas (Austin, 1963-). Annie Doom Pickrell, Pioneer Women in Texas (Austin: Steck, 1929). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832–1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941).

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Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Handbook of Texas Online, "Scott, James [1799–1856]," accessed May 27, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fsc25.

Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Modified on April 1, 2012. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.