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SCARBOROUGH, JOHN B.

SCARBOROUGH, JOHN B. (1847–1905). John B. Scarborough, lawyer and teacher, son of Irvine and Frances Scarborough, was born in Jackson Parish, Louisiana, on April 5, 1847. He left Lebanon University at the age of seventeen to enlist in the Confederate Army. He was twice wounded in the Red River Campaign but soon recovered and served until the end of the war. In 1869 he moved to Smith County, Texas, where he taught school at Mount Carmel and Mount Sylvan before being admitted to the bar. With his wife, the former Mary Adelaide Ellison, whom he had married on August 11, 1870, and their three children, including George Moore and Emily Dorothy Scarborough, he moved to Sweetwater in 1882 and from there to Waco in 1887. Scarborough was prominent in the Baptist Church as well as in legal circles. He was made a trustee of Baylor University in 1888. He died in Waco on April 7, or perhaps May 7, 1905, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Waco.

John B. Wilder

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The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Handbook of Texas Online, John B. Wilder, "Scarborough, John B.," accessed February 12, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fsc02.

Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.