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PASCHAL, ISAIAH ADDISON

PASCHAL, ISAIAH ADDISON (1808–1868). Isaiah Addison Paschal, lawyer, jurist, and legislator, was born in Lexington, Georgia, in 1808. In Georgia he read law under Col. Frank Hardeman. He was admitted to the bar in 1830 and in 1833 moved to Louisiana, where he later served in the legislature and on the bench of a circuit court. He moved to San Antonio, Texas, in 1845 and practiced law there until 1857, when he was elected to the Texas legislature. He was a Unionist member of the Constitutional Convention of 1866, where he caused factional lines to be drawn very closely by introducing a resolution to require each member of the convention to take the constitutional oath, a requirement that would have disqualified most of the members of the convention. Paschal was a Presbyterian. He died at his home in San Antonio on February 21, 1868.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 
Lewis E. Daniell, Texas-The Country and Its Men (Austin?, 1924?).
Claude Elliott

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Handbook of Texas Online, Claude Elliott, "Paschal, Isaiah Addison," accessed August 29, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fpa47.

Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.