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MCCORMICK, ARTHUR (?–1824). Arthur McCormick, early Harris County settler and member of Stephen F. Austin's Old Three Hundred colonists, was born in Ireland and on August 10, 1824, received title to a sitio of land on Buffalo Bayou, now in Harris County. Dr. Johnson Calhoun Hunter surveyed McCormick's land sometime before December 1824. McCormick drowned that year. His widow, Peggy McCormickqv, aged between twenty-five and forty, and her two sons were listed in the colony census for March 1826. In November 1826 Dr. Hunter was suing the widow for both the surveying fee and a medical bill. A labor of land was posthumously issued to McCormick in 1838. The battle of San Jacinto was fought on the McCormick land.


Eugene C. Barker, ed., The Austin Papers (3 vols., Washington: GPO, 1924–28). Lester G. Bugbee, "The Old Three Hundred: A List of Settlers in Austin's First Colony," Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 1 (October 1897). Louis Wiltz Kemp Papers, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Diana J. Kleiner

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Diana J. Kleiner, "MCCORMICK, ARTHUR," Handbook of Texas Online (, accessed December 01, 2015. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.