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MARLIN, WILLIAM N. P. (ca. 1819–?). William Marlin was born about 1819. He came with his family from Tennessee to Texas and settled at the falls of the Brazos River, six or seven miles from the site of present Marlin. On February 2, 1835, he received title to one-fourth league of land on Big Creek two miles south of Marlin in what is now Falls County. He became a scout and ranger and for a number of years was a freighter for George Barnard and the Torrey Trading Houses.qqv In April and May 1843 Marlin delivered some Waco Indian girls to their homes and a Comanche Indian girl to the Indian agent Joseph C. Eldridge. A William Marlin of the ranger service went on a scouting expedition with reservation Indians in 1858 and was involved in quarrels over treatment of the reservation Indians in 1859.


James T. DeShields, Border Wars of Texas, ed. Matt Bradley (Tioga, Texas, 1912; rpt., Waco: Texian Press, 1976). Amelia W. Williams and Eugene C. Barker, eds., The Writings of Sam Houston, 1813–1863 (8 vols., Austin: University of Texas Press, 1938–43; rpt., Austin and New York: Pemberton Press, 1970).

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"MARLIN, WILLIAM N. P.," Handbook of Texas Online (, accessed November 30, 2015. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.